History

The hall was built by the villagers themselves on the vicarage orchard from mainly prefabricated concrete with work being carried out almost every evening and Saturday over a period of 12 months in 1951 and 1952. A kitchen extension was built in 1960, again by voluntary labour.

It was built because the School buildings became no longer available for community use. The cost was raised by loans and fundraising in the village.

By 2007 it became clear that the hall would not survive much longer as its facilities and structure were out of date with modern requirements, so local residents came together to plan a replacement.

The designs and planning were well established when, in 2010, an amazing act of generosity took place.

Batheaston-New-Village-Hall-History

The existing Batheaston Church Hall was the brainchild of the then Vicar, Rev. Reg. Evans. 

PATSY TOWNSEND

PatsyPatsy Townsend, a lifelong Batheaston resident left a legacy, the funds from the sale of her home. A charity was set up by local residents to administer the funds and to move the project forward.

A new hall was designed and in 2013 planning approval from B&NES planners was given. Unfortunately, over the next 4 years, the plans were challenged causing a very costly delay. However, in 2017, a final set of approved plans went unchallenged clearing the way for progress to be made. Throughout this time the Trustees were shown unwavering support from the wider Batheaston community.

However, as the years passed by, the Old Hall inevitably reached the end of its safe and workable life and following a respectful party of celebration for all of those years, it was demolished in June 2018

The Trustees now really need your help to rebuild this essential venue and allow all of those village groups to return and bring back those lost social opportunities for all.

We are currently hoping to go forward with the plans and to have builders by the end of the year. However we really need your continued help and support to rebuild this essential venue and allow village groups to return and bring back those lost social opportunities for all.

Unfortunately it was decided that the Hall had reached the end of its workable life. Following a party put on and attended by the local residents to celebrate the place within the community for over 50 years, it was demolished in June.

Finally, challenges to the approved plans were dropped paving way for the project to proceed. The delays were recognised as frustrating and very costly but solid support from the Batheaston community showed that the New Village Hall was a worthy project and one to urgently progress before costs spiraled further out of reach.

The new hall was designed and planning approval from B&NES planners was given. Unfortunately, the design at that time, although approved by planning, raised several issues that were formally challenged, resulting in the project failing to get off the ground. Sadly, several years were lost and much energy spent which were to fully test the resolve of the New Village Hall Trustees.

PatsyThe residents had created some designs and started planning but hadn’t been able to move forward. However Patsy Townsend, a lifelong Batheaston resident, sadly passed away leaving behind a generous legacy. This legacy was the funds from the sale of her home. Using these funds a charity was set up by local residents to administer them and to move the project forward.

By this time it had become clear that the hall would not survive much longer as its facilities and structure were out of date with modern requirements, so local residents came together to plan a replacement.

The villagers again banded together to build a kitchen extension.

The existing Batheaston Church Hall was the brainchild of the then Vicar, Rev. Reg. Evans. It was built because the School buildings became no longer available for community use. The cost was raised by loans and fundraising by the village. The hall was then built by the villagers volunteering their time on evenings and Saturdays over a period of 12 months. It was built mainly out of prefabricated concrete on the vicarage orchard.